How To Declutter Before Moving To Your New Home

If there is one project you will be thankful for taking on before a move it’s a giant declutter session. Or even sessions. It doesn’t matter how many it takes you, getting rid of the stuff that just sits around taking up space and collecting dust feels liberating.

Because stuff is more than just stuff. Everything comes with a reason or attachment that is keeping us from letting go. Even your cell phone from 2012 that you’ve been planning to recycle responsibly for years.

Sometimes the “junk” we collect in drawers and boxes has a lot more to say about us than the more sentimental items like holey t-shirts and ticket stubs.

But don’t worry we won’t go there. Instead, here are four different tactics for getting the clutter out before moving day. Because less stuff means fewer boxes, less to carry and less unpacking.

Let’s start with the most extreme, what would you do if you had to start over from scratch? If you couldn’t take anything with you what would you need to run out and replace ASAP? What are the non-negotiables that make your life yours?

Alternatively, schedule small bursts throughout the next few weeks where you tackle decluttering room by room. Breaking down a total declutter into smaller projects makes it easier to wrap our brains around. I’d recommend tackling one room per weekend.

If you’re finding that breaking up your declutter room by room is too overwhelming, here’s a different technique. Plan a few days a week where you set a timer for just an hour or two to go through one junk drawer/closet/bookshelf at a time. This works because it puts an immediate end in sight that you can quite literally count down to.

Struggling with what to keep and what to toss?

Consider how often do you actually use the item in question. If it’s of sentimental value how often do you pull it out to reminisce? Did you think to yourself “Wow! I totally forgot about this”? What value does this item add to your day to day to life? If the answer is rarely to never, it’s time to let go.

Sort items into the classic four box system. Create four boxes or piles: keep, donate, pack away, toss. And then, once everything is sorted, take action! Actually, donate those items. Toss out your collections of dead pens and old cell phones.  

Or box everything up, bring it with you to the new place and toss or donate anything you haven’t unpacked within a month. With the exception of seasonal items, of course. The downside here is that you’re still going to have to pack it all up and move. But it’s a less extreme version of imagining you are starting over from scratch. 

How to Help Your Family Cope with a Move

Moving to a new home is difficult for everyone. Children, pets, not even you are immune to the stresses of adjusting to a new life. But moving can also be a great experience. They can help a family grow closer together, discover new interests and hobbies, and create new memories together.

In this article, we’re going to give you some moving tips that will help you and your family make the most of your decision to relocate, and maybe give you a new optimism to endure the stressful process of moving.

Making a move easier on your pets

When our pets are sick or upset it can be heartbreaking for us. We can’t use our words to explain that everything will be okay. Generally, pets are resilient and can often adapt easily to a new environment. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try to help make it easier for them.

To introduce your pet to their new home, take them for a visit before the move, if possible. Let them sniff around for a while and get comfortable with the place, assuring them that there is no danger there.

On moving day, have your pet stay with a relative or pet-sitter for the day so they don’t get lost or trampled on during the hectic moving process.

Once you’re all moved in, let your pet explore the new home freely, making sure their toys, bedding, or litter box are all within their reach.

Helping kids cope with a move

A move can be particularly stressful for children. Oftentimes moving homes means changing schools, leaving old friends and making new ones.

Before you even begin looking at homes, try to get your child involved in the process so they don’t feel powerless. Encourage them by showing them fun things to do in their new town, like nice parks or their favorite stores. Get them involved in planning out their new room, like how it will be painted and decorated.

In terms of school, try to time your move so that your child can make some friends before the school year begins. Plus, explain to them how easy it is to stay in touch with old friends through email, Facebook, or whatever method is appropriate for their age. Find out if there are children in your new neighborhood, or a club or sport that your child can join to help them make new friends.

Don’t neglect your own anxiety

While it’s important to help our family deal with the new move, it’s also vital to take care of our own needs. Make sure you spend time on your own interests and try to avoid isolating yourself from others during this stressful time.

If you’re starting a new job, take note of whether or not you’re bringing that stress home with you and try to set aside time for yourself to do the things you like to help you unwind. If you find yourself feeling overwhelmed, be sure to reach out to your spouse, a friend, and/or a counselor.

If you and your family take the time to help each other, there’s no reason you shouldn’t have a fun move and enjoy your new home together.

Steps To Take After You Buy A New Home

Moving into a new home can be overwhelming. Once you have gone through the long process of buying a home, when the keys are your hand, your mind could be swirling with tons of ideas for what you should do in your new space. There are a few important things that you need to complete before you get into painting those walls or buying a new sofa. Read on for tips.

Look At Your Things

In the excitement of moving, you may forget about all of the stuff that you actually moved into the home. If you hired movers, check your boxes. Make sure that nothing is broken or damaged from the move. If there is anything wrong, you can file a complaint with your moving company.

Turn The Utilities On

The utilities need to be turned over to you from the previous owner. In many cases, you’ll need to contact the local utility companies in order to get the bills switched to your name and the services started. This is important for you to have a completely functioning household. Cable and Internet is a choice provider that you’ll also need to set up ahead of time before your move.

Unpack Your Stuff

Rome wasn’t built in a day but you need certain things like clothes and coffee makers as soon as you move into a space. Find the boxes that have the most important things in them like sheets, blankets, clothing, and important appliances. Work your way out. You don’t want your new home to stay a complete disaster zone forever. 

Organize Your Stuff

Moving into a new home gives you a new opportunity to get organized. Get everything in order the first time. This will keep you from needing to clean up constantly at a later date. When you start off with good organization you’ll be a lot happier in your new home. 

Think Security

Make sure that your new home is secure for your family. Think of everything from accidents to crime. Install an alarm system. Change the locks. Inspect the property for any hazards. All of these activities can help to make your new home a more secure place to live. 

Learn About Your New Surroundings

When you move into a new neighborhood, you should take the time to get to know the area. This includes meeting your neighbors and taking a stroll around your neighborhood to see the area more closely. Discover the highlights of the area like restaurants, shops, and other activities. Enjoy the new place that you call home to the fullest!

Tips to Make Your New Community Feel Like Home

Moving to a new town can be overwhelming. We are creatures of habit and moving to a new home in a new town puts us totally out of our comfort zone overnight. Being uprooted from our communities and day to day routines can leave us feeling a little lost. If you plan to or recently have moved to a new town keep reading for some tips on how to feel at home in your new community.

Introduce yourself. A great way to do this is by hosting a housewarming party and inviting new neighbors to attend alongside your family and friends. For the shy, taking a walk around the neighborhood and introducing yourself, if you happen to run into a neighbor, may feel like a more natural way to make your introductions.

Explore the area. Whether it’s by car, bike, or foot get out there and discover your new neighborhood and town. Discover hidden gems and familiarize yourself with different routes you can use to get around.

Shop local. Stop into the local restaurants and shops in your area. Becoming a regular at a spot to your particular liking can be a great way to become a part of the local community and even put you in a position to make some local friends.

Play tourist. Get to know your new town by becoming familiar with the sites and places of note it is famous for. Check out the visitor center, community center and/or town hall for information on the attractions that make your town unique.

Meetup. Hop online and browse the site Meetup.com for any groups in your local area that are interested in the same hobbies and/or activities as you. This is a great way to find your niche in your new community. If you are shy it is a great way to make friends in the area since you will have something in common with group members right off the bat.

Go off the beaten path. Research where the local trails are in your area and pick a day to explore one. Being in nature is a great stress reliever, which is perfect after a big move. A lot of areas offer group walks along their trails which are a great way to meet other community members.

Volunteer. Another great way to meet others in the community is by volunteering for local organizations. Not only will you be helping those in need within the community but you will be working side by side with others who enjoy helping as well.

Read local. Pick up the local paper or join some of your area’s related Facebook pages to find out about events happening in your new town. Attending ones that pertain to your interests or even some that push your comfort zone will get you out and socializing with your fellow townspeople.

While immersing yourself in the community of your new town can leave you feeling a little bit like the new kid in class, it doesn’t have to be quite so painful. With a little bravery and willingness to get out of the house, you will be sure to feel at home in your new community in no time.